locked Mystery Station #WSPR #band 630 meters #WSPR #band


Joe Hobart
 

A station is transmitting WSPR type signals at 475.690 (1490 on waterfall) that I am unable to decode. The signals appear to have correct WSPR timing, but there are signs of over or excessive modulation. The signals are especially strong around sunset and sunrise when other signals have disappeared or have not yet appeared.
Receive location is Flagstaff, north-central Arizona, DM45.
Is there a way to identify such a station or get an idea where the station is located for possible contact? This station possibly transmits 24/7 - at times every other 2 minute WSPR segment, although this varies.
Thanks,
Joe, W7LUX, Flagstaff, Arizona


Robert Rose
 

I love a good mystery. I assume that mapping programs can’t decode the signal either? Only way I know then would be to get two or more azimuth readings and triangulate. If it is in Area 51 do let us know.

I will pass this on to a friend in Prescott, Art KG6AY.

73
Bob KN6UXD DM13

On Dec 5, 2022, at 11:41 PM, Joe Hobart via groups.io <jrhobart@...> wrote:

A station is transmitting WSPR type signals at 475.690 (1490 on waterfall) that I am unable to decode. The signals appear to have correct WSPR timing, but there are signs of over or excessive modulation. The signals are especially strong around sunset and sunrise when other signals have disappeared or have not yet appeared.
Receive location is Flagstaff, north-central Arizona, DM45.
Is there a way to identify such a station or get an idea where the station is located for possible contact? This station possibly transmits 24/7 - at times every other 2 minute WSPR segment, although this varies.
Thanks,
Joe, W7LUX, Flagstaff, Arizona





Robert Rose
 

Joe:

I see on the Wikipedia entry for "630-meter band" that "amateurs have experimented with weak-signal radio communication near 474.2 kHz, utilising WSPR <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WSPR_(amateur_radio_software)>." It is also reorted there that:

"In the United States, the Federal Communications Commission approved allocating 472–479 kHz on a secondary basis to the amateur service, in a report and order released on 29 March 2017. Amateurs wishing to operate on the band will need to notify the Utilities Technology Council (UTC) and be separated at least 1 km (1000 yards) from electric transmission lines that carry power-line communication (PLC) signals that use the same band. The maximum EIRP is 5 watts with the transmitter output power not exceeding 500 watts PEP. CW, RTTY, data, phone, and image emissions are allowed. The first US amateur stations activated the band on Friday 13 October 2017."

Perhaps you should check with the Utilities Technology Council and see whether they have received any notifications for Arizona? Their website is utc.org <http://utc.org/>. Scanning their website It seems that they are heavily invested in radio communications and while I hope that I am wrong, they may view amateur radio as thorn in their side, so be guided accordingly. Here is a contact point that may be a place to start:

Rob Thormeyer, Senior Director of Communications and Advocacy
Email: Rob.Thormeyer@...

73
Bob Rose
robert.rose@...
KN6UXD
DM13ld

On Dec 5, 2022, at 7:07 PM, Joe Hobart via groups.io <jrhobart@...> wrote:

A station is transmitting WSPR type signals at 475.690 (1490 on waterfall) that I am unable to decode. The signals appear to have correct WSPR timing, but there are signs of over or excessive modulation. The signals are especially strong around sunset and sunrise when other signals have disappeared or have not yet appeared.
Receive location is Flagstaff, north-central Arizona, DM45.
Is there a way to identify such a station or get an idea where the station is located for possible contact? This station possibly transmits 24/7 - at times every other 2 minute WSPR segment, although this varies.
Thanks,
Joe, W7LUX, Flagstaff, Arizona





M0PWX
 

There is other modes on that band like FST4W

The clue is normally if you watch the waterfall the signal lasts longer than the normal 2 minute WSPR cycle

The time periods are 120, 300, 900 and 1800 seconds

Once you have the correct time slot give it a go

Peter
M0PWX

M0PWX Grabber Page (qsl.net)<https://www.qsl.net/m0pwx/grabbers.htm>

From: Robert Rose via groups.io<mailto:robert.rose@...>
Sent: 06 December 2022 08:35
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io<mailto:main@WSJTX.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Mystery Station #WSPR #band 630 meters

I love a good mystery. I assume that mapping programs can’t decode the signal either? Only way I know then would be to get two or more azimuth readings and triangulate. If it is in Area 51 do let us know.

I will pass this on to a friend in Prescott, Art KG6AY.

73
Bob KN6UXD DM13
On Dec 5, 2022, at 11:41 PM, Joe Hobart via groups.io <jrhobart@...> wrote:

A station is transmitting WSPR type signals at 475.690 (1490 on waterfall) that I am unable to decode. The signals appear to have correct WSPR timing, but there are signs of over or excessive modulation. The signals are especially strong around sunset and sunrise when other signals have disappeared or have not yet appeared.
Receive location is Flagstaff, north-central Arizona, DM45.
Is there a way to identify such a station or get an idea where the station is located for possible contact? This station possibly transmits 24/7 - at times every other 2 minute WSPR segment, although this varies.
Thanks,
Joe, W7LUX, Flagstaff, Arizona


Alan G4ZFQ
 

On 06/12/2022 09:32, M0PWX wrote:
The clue is normally if you watch the waterfall the signal lasts
Peter, Bob.

The exact TX periods are given in the manual 17.2.10. Summary.

FST4W-120 is actually 1.3 seconds shorter than "2 minute" WSPR.

73 Alan G4ZFQ


Joe Hobart
 

Mystery solved: the 630 meter station I had not been able to decode is W7IUV in
central Washington. Lawrence has a great signal in northern Arizona.

I am unfamiliar with FST4W, and it had not occurred to me there are other modes
with the same time signature as WSPR.

Thanks to all for your comments and suggestions.

Joe, W7LUX

On 12/6/2022 2:32 AM, M0PWX wrote:
There is other modes on that band like FST4W

The clue is normally if you watch the waterfall the signal lasts longer than the normal 2 minute WSPR cycle

The time periods are 120, 300, 900 and 1800 seconds

Once you have the correct time slot give it a go

Peter
M0PWX

M0PWX Grabber Page (qsl.net)<https://www.qsl.net/m0pwx/grabbers.htm>

From: Robert Rose via groups.io<mailto:robert.rose@...>
Sent: 06 December 2022 08:35
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io<mailto:main@WSJTX.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Mystery Station #WSPR #band 630 meters

I love a good mystery. I assume that mapping programs can’t decode the signal either? Only way I know then would be to get two or more azimuth readings and triangulate. If it is in Area 51 do let us know.

I will pass this on to a friend in Prescott, Art KG6AY.

73
Bob KN6UXD DM13
On Dec 5, 2022, at 11:41 PM, Joe Hobart via groups.io <jrhobart@...> wrote:

A station is transmitting WSPR type signals at 475.690 (1490 on waterfall) that I am unable to decode. The signals appear to have correct WSPR timing, but there are signs of over or excessive modulation. The signals are especially strong around sunset and sunrise when other signals have disappeared or have not yet appeared.
Receive location is Flagstaff, north-central Arizona, DM45.
Is there a way to identify such a station or get an idea where the station is located for possible contact? This station possibly transmits 24/7 - at times every other 2 minute WSPR segment, although this varies.
Thanks,
Joe, W7LUX, Flagstaff, Arizona






Joe Hobart
 

Mystery solved: the 630 meter station I had not been able to decode is W7IUV in
central Washington. Lawrence has a great signal in northern Arizona. The transmission decoded as soon as I selected FST4W mode.

I am unfamiliar with FST4W, and it had not occurred to me there are other modes
with the same time signature as WSPR.

Thanks to all for your comments and suggestions.

Joe, W7LUX

On Tuesday, December 6, 2022, 4:27:19 AM MST, Alan G4ZFQ <alan4alan@...> wrote:

On 06/12/2022 09:32, M0PWX wrote:
The clue is normally if you watch the waterfall the signal lasts
Peter, Bob.

The exact TX periods are given in the manual 17.2.10. Summary.

FST4W-120 is actually 1.3 seconds shorter than "2 minute" WSPR.

73 Alan G4ZFQ