Topics

locked Being called when just monitoring and not transmitting


David Gould
 

I run WSJT-X (2.2.2) and JTAlert (2.16.15).  Recently I have spent quite a lot of time just monitoring 15m, and never transmitting.  I have noticed several times that I get called by a "station" with the right format  eg      "G3UEG  IO6YIP BG06           a2"

How can this happen?  IO6YIP is not on QRZ.COM so is suspect.  How is my callsign known, I have NOT transmitted at all , not even tuned up.

This has happened probably 6/8 times over the last couple of months.  Sometimes the message format is obviously gibberish, but sometimes nearly right as above.

I am perplexed!

73,
Dave  G3UEG


Bill Somerville
 

On 16/12/2020 15:51, David Gould wrote:
I run WSJT-X (2.2.2) and JTAlert (2.16.15).  Recently I have spent quite a lot of time just monitoring 15m, and never transmitting.  I have noticed several times that I get called by a "station" with the right format  eg      "G3UEG  IO6YIP BG06           a2"

How can this happen?  IO6YIP is not on QRZ.COM so is suspect.  How is my callsign known, I have NOT transmitted at all , not even tuned up.

This has happened probably 6/8 times over the last couple of months.  Sometimes the message format is obviously gibberish, but sometimes nearly right as above.

I am perplexed!

73,
Dave  G3UEG
Hi Dave,

this happens because of AP decoding techniques, it is a false decode. In this case a priori decoding postulates that you might be being called as a result of calling CQ and, by assuming messages might be to you, it can increase sensitivity to messages where that information may be erased (missing) due to QSB or interference. Because the reduced number of bits being decoded, the false decode probability is slightly raised due to the smaller set of possible decodes. Check the WSJT-X User Guide for information on what the "a2" indicates:

https://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx-doc/wsjtx-main-2.2.2.html#AP_Decoding

73
Bill
G4WJS.


 

I though I read once that WSJT-X tries and correlate what it can’t quite decode with calls it’s seen before. This is obviously gibberish, as the grid-square is in the middle of the south pacific, and not in Italy.

 

73 Phil GM3ZZA

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: David Gould
Sent: 16 December 2020 15:52
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: [WSJTX] Being called when just monitoring and not transmitting

 

I run WSJT-X (2.2.2) and JTAlert (2.16.15).  Recently I have spent quite a lot of time just monitoring 15m, and never transmitting.  I have noticed several times that I get called by a "station" with the right format  eg      "G3UEG  IO6YIP BG06           a2"

How can this happen?  IO6YIP is not on QRZ.COM so is suspect.  How is my callsign known, I have NOT transmitted at all , not even tuned up.

This has happened probably 6/8 times over the last couple of months.  Sometimes the message format is obviously gibberish, but sometimes nearly right as above.

I am perplexed!

73,
Dave  G3UEG

 


--
73 Phil GM3ZZA


Bill Somerville
 

Hi Phil,

that's not correct, there's no use of previously decoded callsigns in the decoder. You may be recalling that some messages have calls substituted with hash codes, which take less space in the message. Such hash codes when decoded can only be only be mapped back to calls if the call has been copied before in full or is the hash of one's own call. That is not part of decoding, just a simple lookup after decoding completes.

73
Bill
G4WJS.

On 16/12/2020 16:10, Philip Rose via groups.io wrote:

I though I read once that WSJT-X tries and correlate what it can’t quite decode with calls it’s seen before. This is obviously gibberish, as the grid-square is in the middle of the south pacific, and not in Italy.

 

73 Phil GM3ZZA

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: David Gould
Sent: 16 December 2020 15:52
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: [WSJTX] Being called when just monitoring and not transmitting

 

I run WSJT-X (2.2.2) and JTAlert (2.16.15).  Recently I have spent quite a lot of time just monitoring 15m, and never transmitting.  I have noticed several times that I get called by a "station" with the right format  eg      "G3UEG  IO6YIP BG06           a2"

How can this happen?  IO6YIP is not on QRZ.COM so is suspect.  How is my callsign known, I have NOT transmitted at all , not even tuned up.

This has happened probably 6/8 times over the last couple of months.  Sometimes the message format is obviously gibberish, but sometimes nearly right as above.

I am perplexed!

73,
Dave  G3UEG


groups@...
 

On 16/12/2020 15:51, David Gould wrote:
I run WSJT-X (2.2.2) and JTAlert (2.16.15).  Recently I have spent quite a lot of time just monitoring 15m, and never transmitting.  I have noticed several times that I get called by a "station" with the right format  eg      "G3UEG  IO6YIP BG06           a2"
How can this happen?  IO6YIP is not on QRZ.COM so is suspect.  How is my callsign known, I have NOT transmitted at all , not even tuned up.
This has happened probably 6/8 times over the last couple of months.  Sometimes the message format is obviously gibberish, but sometimes nearly right as above.
I am perplexed!
73,
Dave  G3UEG
That's happened to me as well. I assumed they were monitoring pskreporter. One, during the ARRL Grid Chase, was so soon after I changed bands and before I'd transmitted that I assume it was an automated station.

Roger
Gw$HZA


Lance Collister, W7GJ
 

Aside from FALSE DECODES, it has happened to me on 6m because WSJT-X is uploading my decodes to PSK Reporter. So sometimes people see that they probably have propagation to me, and that my rig is obviously turned on, so they call me out of the blue! If I am here, I am happy to work them ;-)

GL and VY 73, Lance

On 12/16/2020 15:51:46, David Gould wrote:
I run WSJT-X (2.2.2) and JTAlert (2.16.15).  Recently I have spent quite a lot of time just monitoring 15m, and never transmitting. I have noticed several times that I get called by a "station" with the right format  eg      "G3UEG  IO6YIP BG06           a2"

How can this happen?  IO6YIP is not on QRZ.COM so is suspect.  How is my callsign known, I have NOT transmitted at all , not even tuned up.

This has happened probably 6/8 times over the last couple of months.  Sometimes the message format is obviously gibberish, but sometimes nearly right as above.

I am perplexed!

73,
Dave  G3UEG

--
Lance Collister, W7GJ(ex WA3GPL, WA1JXN, WA1JXN/C6A, ZF2OC/ZF8, E51SIX, 3D2LR, 5W0GJ, E6M, TX5K, KH8/W7GJ, V6M, T8GJ, VK9CGJ, VK9XGJ, C21GJ, CP1GJ, S79GJ, TX7MB)
P.O. Box 73
Frenchtown, MT 59834-0073
USA
TEL: (406) 626-5728
QTH: DN27ub
URL: http://www.bigskyspaces.com/w7gj
Skype: lanceW7GJ
2m DXCC #11 - 6m DXCC #815 - FFMA #7

Interested in 6m EME? Ask me about subscribing to the new Magic Band EME
email group, or just fill in the request box at the bottom of my web
page (above)!


Jon KM8V
 

On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 11:03 AM, Bill Somerville wrote:
\
Hi Dave,

this happens because of AP decoding techniques, it is a false decode. In
this case a priori decoding postulates that you might be being called as
a result of calling CQ and, by assuming messages might be to you, it can
increase sensitivity to messages where that information may be erased
(missing) due to QSB or interference. Because the reduced number of bits
being decoded, the false decode probability is slightly raised due to
the smaller set of possible decodes. Check the WSJT-X User Guide for
information on what the "a2" indicates:

https://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx-doc/wsjtx-main-2.2.2.html#AP_Decoding

73
Bill
G4WJS.
I've seen what seems to me as an increasing incidence of these types of "out of the blue" false decodes.

Perhaps this exists already and I haven't found it, but I think it would be interesting to have a more granular option to Enable AP - for example, perhaps only enabling a3-a6 where it contains the value of DX Call. 

I often hesitate to disable AP completely, because if I am working a weak station I want the advantage, but it sure would be nice to eliminate the obviously false decodes.

73 de KM8V Jon


Frank Donovan
 

It isn't just WSJT-X that has problems with false decoding...

I have several SSB QSL cards received from from HL and JA stations
for W3RPR.  The QSOs are in my log.

How do you suppose that happened?

Extra credit:  how did I get the QSLs?

73
Frank
W3LPL



From: "Jon KM8V" <perlguy9@...>
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 16, 2020 8:05:38 PM
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Being called when just monitoring and not transmitting

On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 11:03 AM, Bill Somerville wrote:
\
Hi Dave,

this happens because of AP decoding techniques, it is a false decode. In
this case a priori decoding postulates that you might be being called as
a result of calling CQ and, by assuming messages might be to you, it can
increase sensitivity to messages where that information may be erased
(missing) due to QSB or interference. Because the reduced number of bits
being decoded, the false decode probability is slightly raised due to
the smaller set of possible decodes. Check the WSJT-X User Guide for
information on what the "a2" indicates:

https://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx-doc/wsjtx-main-2.2.2.html#AP_Decoding

73
Bill
G4WJS.
I've seen what seems to me as an increasing incidence of these types of "out of the blue" false decodes.

Perhaps this exists already and I haven't found it, but I think it would be interesting to have a more granular option to Enable AP - for example, perhaps only enabling a3-a6 where it contains the value of DX Call. 

I often hesitate to disable AP completely, because if I am working a weak station I want the advantage, but it sure would be nice to eliminate the obviously false decodes.

73 de KM8V Jon





Michael WA7SKG
 

I'm not sure false decodes have anything to do with it. I think it is more likely someone is watching PSKreporter and seeing a station in an area they are looking for is reporting seeing his call and calls that station. All a person needs to do is call CQ or otherwise make a transmission for a short time, wait a few minutes, then check PSKReporter for all stations that reported hearing their call. If they see someone in an area they are looking for, like a state or grid square, they take a chance and call that station.

One of the options in WSJT-X is reporting to the Internet, so when you turn on your system and start receiving signals, everything you hear is reported to the PSKReporter database. Some folks leave their equipment on all the time monitoring and reporting, even though they are not at the radio or paying attention. As this is the default setting, many people don't even realize it is happening.

Many times I have left the radio and computer on after operating for a while to come back later and see several stations, especially Japanese stations, have called me while I was away from the radio.

While this may not necessarily be an accepted practice, it is a somewhat common one. Naturally, it is entirely up to you whether you answer these unsolicited calls.

73,
Michael WA7SKG


Jon KM8V wrote on 12/16/20 12:05 PM:

On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 11:03 AM, Bill Somerville wrote:
\
Hi Dave,
this happens because of AP decoding techniques, it is a false
decode. In
this case a priori decoding postulates that you might be being
called as
a result of calling CQ and, by assuming messages might be to you, it
can
increase sensitivity to messages where that information may be erased
(missing) due to QSB or interference. Because the reduced number of
bits
being decoded, the false decode probability is slightly raised due to
the smaller set of possible decodes. Check the WSJT-X User Guide for
information on what the "a2" indicates:
https://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx-doc/wsjtx-main-2.2.2.html#AP_Decoding
73
Bill
G4WJS.
I've seen what seems to me as an increasing incidence of these types of "out of the blue" false decodes.
Perhaps this exists already and I haven't found it, but I think it would be interesting to have a more granular option to Enable AP - for example, perhaps only enabling a3-a6 where it contains the value of DX Call.
I often hesitate to disable AP completely, because if I am working a weak station I want the advantage, but it sure would be nice to eliminate the obviously false decodes.
73 de KM8V Jon


Bill Somerville
 

Michael,

he false decode reported by the OP was:
G3UEG  IO6YIP BG06
this is clearly a false decode as gridsquare BG06 is nowhere near Italy, also I am not sure that IO prefixes are even issued.

BTW PSKReporter spotting is no the default, you have to enable it.

73
Bill
G4WJS.

On 16/12/2020 20:33, Michael WA7SKG wrote:
I'm not sure false decodes have anything to do with it. I think it is more likely someone is watching PSKreporter and seeing a station in an area they are looking for is reporting seeing his call and calls that station.  All a person needs to do is call CQ or otherwise make a transmission for a short time, wait a few minutes, then check PSKReporter for all stations that reported hearing their call. If they see someone in an area they are looking for, like a state or grid square, they take a chance and call that station.

One of the options in WSJT-X is reporting to the Internet, so when you turn on your system and start receiving signals, everything you hear is reported to the PSKReporter database. Some folks leave their equipment on all the time monitoring and reporting, even though they are not at the radio or paying attention. As this is the default setting, many people don't even realize it is happening.

Many times I have left the radio and computer on after operating for a while to come back later and see several stations, especially Japanese stations, have called me while I was away from the radio.

While this may not necessarily be an accepted practice, it is a somewhat common one. Naturally, it is entirely up to you whether you answer these unsolicited calls.

73,
Michael WA7SKG


Jon KM8V wrote on 12/16/20 12:05 PM:
On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 11:03 AM, Bill Somerville wrote:

    \
    Hi Dave,

    this happens because of AP decoding techniques, it is a false
    decode. In
    this case a priori decoding postulates that you might be being
    called as
    a result of calling CQ and, by assuming messages might be to you, it
    can
    increase sensitivity to messages where that information may be erased
    (missing) due to QSB or interference. Because the reduced number of
    bits
    being decoded, the false decode probability is slightly raised due to
    the smaller set of possible decodes. Check the WSJT-X User Guide for
    information on what the "a2" indicates:

    https://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx-doc/wsjtx-main-2.2.2.html#AP_Decoding

    73
    Bill
    G4WJS.

I've seen what seems to me as an increasing incidence of these types of "out of the blue" false decodes.

Perhaps this exists already and I haven't found it, but I think it would be interesting to have a more granular option to Enable AP - for example, perhaps only enabling a3-a6 where it contains the value of DX Call.

I often hesitate to disable AP completely, because if I am working a weak station I want the advantage, but it sure would be nice to eliminate the obviously false decodes.

73 de KM8V Jon


Bill Somerville
 

On 16/12/2020 20:05, Jon KM8V wrote:
On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 11:03 AM, Bill Somerville wrote:
\
Hi Dave,

this happens because of AP decoding techniques, it is a false decode. In
this case a priori decoding postulates that you might be being called as
a result of calling CQ and, by assuming messages might be to you, it can
increase sensitivity to messages where that information may be erased
(missing) due to QSB or interference. Because the reduced number of bits
being decoded, the false decode probability is slightly raised due to
the smaller set of possible decodes. Check the WSJT-X User Guide for
information on what the "a2" indicates:

https://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx-doc/wsjtx-main-2.2.2.html#AP_Decoding

73
Bill
G4WJS.
I've seen what seems to me as an increasing incidence of these types of "out of the blue" false decodes.

Perhaps this exists already and I haven't found it, but I think it would be interesting to have a more granular option to Enable AP - for example, perhaps only enabling a3-a6 where it contains the value of DX Call. 

I often hesitate to disable AP completely, because if I am working a weak station I want the advantage, but it sure would be nice to eliminate the obviously false decodes.

73 de KM8V Jon

Hi Jon,

all false decodes are "out of the blue". Also note that a2 AP decoding is disabled 5 minutes after your last transmission or transmission attempt as we fully understand that it is unlikely that you will be called if you have not transmitted for some time. Last transmitted is quite loosely defined in WSJT-X, it includes sending an message, using the "Tune" button, and clicking the "Enable Tx" button even if the transmission is cancelled before it starts.

73
Bill
G4WJS.


Michael WA7SKG
 

Just playing devil's advocate here.

While I agree the gridsquare is curious (I did not look it up when I first saw the post), there are folks who operate maritime mobile, so that is a possibility.

While there are not a lot of IO6 calls issued, and that particular one does not show up in QRZ.com, there are lots of DX calls that are not in QRZ.com that are perfectly valid calls. Since many IO calls are special event stations assigned temporarily, it is not unfeasible that it is a valid call. Maybe for a special south Pacific cruise? (There are 190 IO* calls and 7 IO6* calls in QRZ.com)

My point is, it is entirely possible to be called without ever transmitting. It has happened to me a number of times. I have answered a number of them and later found it to be a person who wanted my particular grid square or county.

I am not discounting that false decodes happen, even though I personally have never seen one. It is just that there are several reasons to see what appears to be a station calling you unsolicited. It would have been interesting to see what happened if the OP responded to any of those calls. If they were a false decode, I assume there would have been no reply. Also, if they were a false decode, it is likely he would have only seen it once. If a station were intentionally called him and he did not reply, there should have been multiple attempts.

As far as reporting goes in WSJT-X, I honestly do not remember. I have installed it on several computers and they all have reported to PSKReporter. I do not recall ever having enabled it specifically, it just started doing it after installation. But then, I have slept since then, so who knows what I have forgotten. And, that I have seen, the OP never specified whether it was enabled in his installation or not.

Just Sayin'

Michael WA7SKG

Bill Somerville wrote on 12/16/20 12:41 PM:

Michael,
he false decode reported by the OP was:
G3UEG  IO6YIP BG06
this is clearly a false decode as gridsquare BG06 is nowhere near Italy, also I am not sure that IO prefixes are even issued.
BTW PSKReporter spotting is no the default, you have to enable it.
73
Bill
G4WJS.
On 16/12/2020 20:33, Michael WA7SKG wrote:
I'm not sure false decodes have anything to do with it. I think it is more likely someone is watching PSKreporter and seeing a station in an area they are looking for is reporting seeing his call and calls that station.  All a person needs to do is call CQ or otherwise make a transmission for a short time, wait a few minutes, then check PSKReporter for all stations that reported hearing their call. If they see someone in an area they are looking for, like a state or grid square, they take a chance and call that station.

One of the options in WSJT-X is reporting to the Internet, so when you turn on your system and start receiving signals, everything you hear is reported to the PSKReporter database. Some folks leave their equipment on all the time monitoring and reporting, even though they are not at the radio or paying attention. As this is the default setting, many people don't even realize it is happening.

Many times I have left the radio and computer on after operating for a while to come back later and see several stations, especially Japanese stations, have called me while I was away from the radio.

While this may not necessarily be an accepted practice, it is a somewhat common one. Naturally, it is entirely up to you whether you answer these unsolicited calls.

73,
Michael WA7SKG


Jon KM8V wrote on 12/16/20 12:05 PM:
On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 11:03 AM, Bill Somerville wrote:

    \
    Hi Dave,

    this happens because of AP decoding techniques, it is a false
    decode. In
    this case a priori decoding postulates that you might be being
    called as
    a result of calling CQ and, by assuming messages might be to you, it
    can
    increase sensitivity to messages where that information may be erased
    (missing) due to QSB or interference. Because the reduced number of
    bits
    being decoded, the false decode probability is slightly raised due to
    the smaller set of possible decodes. Check the WSJT-X User Guide for
    information on what the "a2" indicates:

https://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx-doc/wsjtx-main-2.2.2.html#AP_Decoding

    73
    Bill
    G4WJS.

I've seen what seems to me as an increasing incidence of these types of "out of the blue" false decodes.

Perhaps this exists already and I haven't found it, but I think it would be interesting to have a more granular option to Enable AP - for example, perhaps only enabling a3-a6 where it contains the value of DX Call.

I often hesitate to disable AP completely, because if I am working a weak station I want the advantage, but it sure would be nice to eliminate the obviously false decodes.

73 de KM8V Jon


Kermit Lehman
 


Aside from people monitoring PSKReporter and calling you when they see you might be able to hear them, if you called CQ with no responses and gave up you may receive a delayed call from someone who heard you but was looking for a better offer.  Not finding any, they decided to call you after a while.  This usually happens within 2-3 minutes after your last CQ.  Or they have seen you working someone on the band recently and decide to give you a delayed tail-end call.


Here's something that happened to me: I  called CQ with no replies so I went for my evening walk (for half an hour).  When I got back my screen was full of calls from a station.  And there was an email accusing me of refusing to answer him.  He was quite upset and rude.


73,

Ken, AB1J


-----Original Message-----
From: Philip Rose via groups.io <gm3zza@...>
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io <main@WSJTX.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Dec 16, 2020 4:10 pm
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Being called when just monitoring and not transmitting

I though I read once that WSJT-X tries and correlate what it can’t quite decode with calls it’s seen before. This is obviously gibberish, as the grid-square is in the middle of the south pacific, and not in Italy.
 
73 Phil GM3ZZA
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
From: David Gould
Sent: 16 December 2020 15:52
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: [WSJTX] Being called when just monitoring and not transmitting
 
I run WSJT-X (2.2.2) and JTAlert (2.16.15).  Recently I have spent quite a lot of time just monitoring 15m, and never transmitting.  I have noticed several times that I get called by a "station" with the right format  eg      "G3UEG  IO6YIP BG06           a2"

How can this happen?  IO6YIP is not on QRZ.COM so is suspect.  How is my callsign known, I have NOT transmitted at all , not even tuned up.

This has happened probably 6/8 times over the last couple of months.  Sometimes the message format is obviously gibberish, but sometimes nearly right as above.

I am perplexed!

73,
Dave  G3UEG
 

--
73 Phil GM3ZZA




Robert Lorenzini
 

Instead of calling CQ WV some of us have found that watching PSKreporter is
more successful. Make a call and check to see if you are being heard at the
location you are targeting. Then look to see if any stations are active there.
If you find a active call there see if he is seeing your area. If you only find
a listening station it is more productive to call him to see if you can wake him up
than calling CQ (state).

Bob - wd6dod


On 12/16/2020 12:05 PM, Jon KM8V wrote:
On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 11:03 AM, Bill Somerville wrote:
\
Hi Dave,

this happens because of AP decoding techniques, it is a false decode. In
this case a priori decoding postulates that you might be being called as
a result of calling CQ and, by assuming messages might be to you, it can
increase sensitivity to messages where that information may be erased
(missing) due to QSB or interference. Because the reduced number of bits
being decoded, the false decode probability is slightly raised due to
the smaller set of possible decodes. Check the WSJT-X User Guide for
information on what the "a2" indicates:

https://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx-doc/wsjtx-main-2.2.2.html#AP_Decoding

73
Bill
G4WJS.
I've seen what seems to me as an increasing incidence of these types of "out of the blue" false decodes.

Perhaps this exists already and I haven't found it, but I think it would be interesting to have a more granular option to Enable AP - for example, perhaps only enabling a3-a6 where it contains the value of DX Call. 

I often hesitate to disable AP completely, because if I am working a weak station I want the advantage, but it sure would be nice to eliminate the obviously false decodes.

73 de KM8V Jon




Gary - AG0N
 

On Dec 16, 2020, at 08:51, David Gould <dave@g3ueg.co.uk> wrote:

How can this happen? IO6YIP is not on QRZ.COM so is suspect. How is my callsign known, I have NOT transmitted at all , not even tuned up.

Easy - happens all the time. They know you’re monitoring because they check with PSKReporter to see who is hearing them. Then, they call them if they want to have a QSO with their area, etc.

Just ignore it. You aren’t secretly calling CQ when you aren’t there. ;) I monitor almost 24/7. I should say my computer does, whether I’m home or not.

Gary - AG0N


Gary - AG0N
 

On Dec 16, 2020, at 13:33, Michael WA7SKG <wa7skg@wa7skg.com> wrote:

While this may not necessarily be an accepted practice, it is a somewhat common one. Naturally, it is entirely up to you whether you answer these unsolicited calls.

Don’t waste your time unless you compare your current time with the time the other station called and find it recent. I frequently find them several hours after they called.

Gary - - AG0N


Dave Garber
 

even if you call a call seen by pskreporter, the other station must still click on your call to continue a contact.   so if he says he worked you and I have no record of doing that, i reject the qsl from eqsl


Dave Garber
VE3WEJ / VE3IE


On Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 11:22 AM Gary - AG0N <mcduffie@...> wrote:


> On Dec 16, 2020, at 13:33, Michael WA7SKG <wa7skg@...> wrote:
>
> While this may not necessarily be an accepted practice, it is a somewhat common one. Naturally, it is entirely up to you whether you answer these unsolicited calls.


Don’t waste your time unless you compare your current time with the time the other station called and find it recent.  I frequently find them several hours after they called.

Gary - - AG0N



Bob Lewis
 

I find that on 6M with not so much activity, it pays to hang around a while after you call CQ. There have been numerous times when someone answers my CQ minutes later. I assume they (like I often do) left WSJT-x monitoring while they were out of the shack. They come back, see the CQ, and give you a call to see if you are still there.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@WSJTX.groups.io [mailto:main@WSJTX.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gary - AG0N
Sent: Wednesday, December 16, 2020 8:34 PM
To: main@wsjtx.groups.io
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Being called when just monitoring and not transmitting



On Dec 16, 2020, at 13:33, Michael WA7SKG <wa7skg@wa7skg.com> wrote:

While this may not necessarily be an accepted practice, it is a somewhat common one. Naturally, it is entirely up to you whether you answer these unsolicited calls.

Don’t waste your time unless you compare your current time with the time the other station called and find it recent. I frequently find them several hours after they called.

Gary - - AG0N


Hasan Schiers N0AN
 

Good point! On 6 meters,  it is especially important to hang around after calling CQ or even just completing a contact. For meteor scatter it can be minutes between decodes.

Another source for being called 'out of the blue' is JTAlert which has an "online indicator" built in to it, if you turn it on. It alerts any other JTA user that you have Alert Messaging turned on and it shows that status on the callsign decode grid. An observer may not message you, but begin calling when they see that you are still 'online' whether in shack or not.

73, N0AN
Hasan


On Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 11:27 AM Bob Lewis <aa4pb@...> wrote:
I find that on 6M with not so much activity, it pays to hang around a while after you call CQ. There have been numerous times when someone answers my CQ minutes later. I assume they (like I often do) left WSJT-x monitoring while they were out of the shack. They come back, see the CQ, and give you a call to see if you are still there.


-----Original Message-----
From: main@WSJTX.groups.io [mailto:main@WSJTX.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gary - AG0N
Sent: Wednesday, December 16, 2020 8:34 PM
To: main@wsjtx.groups.io
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Being called when just monitoring and not transmitting



> On Dec 16, 2020, at 13:33, Michael WA7SKG <wa7skg@...> wrote:
>
> While this may not necessarily be an accepted practice, it is a somewhat common one. Naturally, it is entirely up to you whether you answer these unsolicited calls.


Don’t waste your time unless you compare your current time with the time the other station called and find it recent.  I frequently find them several hours after they called.

Gary - - AG0N





Alek Petkovic
 

Even though you have not transmitted anything, your station is reporting everything it receives to PSK Reporter.
People look at PSK reporter when they transmit and after a few minutes, the display will update and they can see all the stations around the world that reported receiving their signal.
I have been called like this a few times and I do it myself.
I see where my signal is being heard and if it is a DXCC entity that I want, I call that specific station, even though I have not seen them transmitting. Sometimes they reply and sometimes nobody id home.
Go to https://pskreporter.info/pskmap.html and try it for yourself.
It has absolutely nothing to do with false decodes, etc.
73, Alek, VK6APK
PS: If you don't want your station to report to PSK Reporter, you can turn the feature off in the settings menu.