WSJT UDP Message Format #networking


wb0smx
 

Hello all,
Can anyone tell me if the Azimuth of the station being called is available in the UDP messages from WSJT?  I've looked through NetworkMessage.hpp, and cannot find a reference to it there. Unless it is RX_DF or TX_DF.  I cannot tell what they are for...
I'd like to extract it in a Node-Red flow, in order to direct my rotator without doing calculations that have already been done.
Thanks...
--
Randy WB0SMX


Bill Somerville
 

On 18/08/2021 22:27, wb0smx wrote:
Hello all,
Can anyone tell me if the Azimuth of the station being called is available in the UDP messages from WSJT?  I've looked through NetworkMessage.hpp, and cannot find a reference to it there. Unless it is RX_DF or TX_DF.  I cannot tell what they are for...
I'd like to extract it in a Node-Red flow, in order to direct my rotator without doing calculations that have already been done.
Thanks...
--
Randy WB0SMX
Hi Randy,

sorry that information is not available via the WSJT-X UDP Message Protocol, the DX Gid that the Az is calculated form is available in the Status(1) message along with the home grid as specified in the "Settings->General" panel.

73
Bill
G4WJS.


wb0smx
 

Ok Thanks for that info, Bill. I’ll go on to plan B...
--
Randy WB0SMX


 

Hi Randy,

 

I read the article on Node-Red in this month’s QST. Is it just a way of documenting the flow necessary to connect the various bits of kit and software apps? Or does it provide the coding environment as well?

 

Thanks Phil GM3ZZA

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: wb0smx
Sent: 18 August 2021 23:00
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: [WSJTX] WSJT UDP Message Format #networking

 

Hello all,
Can anyone tell me if the Azimuth of the station being called is available in the UDP messages from WSJT?  I've looked through NetworkMessage.hpp, and cannot find a reference to it there. Unless it is RX_DF or TX_DF.  I cannot tell what they are for...
I'd like to extract it in a Node-Red flow, in order to direct my rotator without doing calculations that have already been done.
Thanks...
--
Randy WB0SMX

 


--
73 Phil GM3ZZA


Michael Black
 

It's a coding environment too.  The example dashboard in the QST article shows an azimuth plot on a world map so looks like somebody has already coded the necessary information.

Mike W9MDB




On Thursday, August 19, 2021, 03:12:28 AM CDT, Philip Rose via groups.io <gm3zza@...> wrote:


Hi Randy,

 

I read the article on Node-Red in this month’s QST. Is it just a way of documenting the flow necessary to connect the various bits of kit and software apps? Or does it provide the coding environment as well?

 

Thanks Phil GM3ZZA

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: wb0smx
Sent: 18 August 2021 23:00
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: [WSJTX] WSJT UDP Message Format #networking

 

Hello all,
Can anyone tell me if the Azimuth of the station being called is available in the UDP messages from WSJT?  I've looked through NetworkMessage.hpp, and cannot find a reference to it there. Unless it is RX_DF or TX_DF.  I cannot tell what they are for...
I'd like to extract it in a Node-Red flow, in order to direct my rotator without doing calculations that have already been done.
Thanks...
--
Randy WB0SMX

 


--
73 Phil GM3ZZA




wb0smx
 

Hi Phillip.  It is a coding environment as well.  It is different from the typical line-by-line structured coding that you may have seen for arduino or other environments.  In Node-Red, there are graphical blocks that you drag onto a working area, each having it's own functionality.  You then fill in some fields in each block to give it the details it needs to do its job, and connect them together in the logical program flow you are working toward.

I am an old-school programmer that is used to structured languages like C & fortran (that dates me!), VB, and things of that ilk.  It took me about 4 hours of playing with Node-Red to become enamored with it.

With Node-Red, I am currently monitoring and controlling my Flex Radio 6400, controlling my beam antenna with a graphical, map-based user interface, and controlling/monitoring a web-based PLC (Programable Logic Controller) that lets me monitor power supply voltages, turn things on and off with a bank of 8 relays, and monitor other status (on/off) of whatever I hook it up to.  And all with a simple to make, simple to use browser-based interface.
It is simple to make connections via internet, local ethernet or serial ports.

It really is a lot of fun, and useful for running my station from a different room, or a different state.

There is a ham radio node-red group on groups.io:  https://groups.io/g/nodered-hamradio
It has lots of flows (programs) that others have put together, and this was the starting point for most of my projects.  It is very easy to copy and paste other's work to your own node-red to get started.

Enjoy!

--
Randy WB0SMX


Sam Birnbaum
 

Hi Randy,

Does it produce a executable for different platforms or does it depend on its own Node-Red runtime environment ?

73, 


Sam W2JDB



-----Original Message-----
From: wb0smx <rdpecken@...>
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Aug 19, 2021 10:57 am
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] WSJT UDP Message Format #networking

Hi Phillip.  It is a coding environment as well.  It is different from the typical line-by-line structured coding that you may have seen for arduino or other environments.  In Node-Red, there are graphical blocks that you drag onto a working area, each having it's own functionality.  You then fill in some fields in each block to give it the details it needs to do its job, and connect them together in the logical program flow you are working toward.

I am an old-school programmer that is used to structured languages like C & fortran (that dates me!), VB, and things of that ilk.  It took me about 4 hours of playing with Node-Red to become enamored with it.

With Node-Red, I am currently monitoring and controlling my Flex Radio 6400, controlling my beam antenna with a graphical, map-based user interface, and controlling/monitoring a web-based PLC (Programable Logic Controller) that lets me monitor power supply voltages, turn things on and off with a bank of 8 relays, and monitor other status (on/off) of whatever I hook it up to.  And all with a simple to make, simple to use browser-based interface.
It is simple to make connections via internet, local ethernet or serial ports.

It really is a lot of fun, and useful for running my station from a different room, or a different state.

There is a ham radio node-red group on groups.io:  https://groups.io/g/nodered-hamradio
It has lots of flows (programs) that others have put together, and this was the starting point for most of my projects.  It is very easy to copy and paste other's work to your own node-red to get started.

Enjoy!


--
Randy WB0SMX




wb0smx
 

It runs in the node-red environment only.  For most people, they have it running on a Raspberry Pi.  They set it up to run automatically on restarts.  Typically, there is a timer or two to set off the program at appropriate intervals, or just once at the right time.  Mine runs 24/7 and attempts to listen to or make connection with the devices periodically if they are not online already.
I've read that  an always on micro such as the PI is better than Windows because of this.
Besides ham radio stuff, it is also useful for other home control projects which would typically be running 24/7.
--
Randy WB0SMX


wb0smx
 

Oh, hate to reply to my own message, but the cool thing is that a program created for node-red on one platform (Linux/Raspbian/Mac/etc) can be easily copied to another platform.  At most, if you haven't loaded some functions that are used in the imported program, you would have to install the missing functions from the new platform node-red.
Much easier than finding missing libraries in C or other languages.
--
Randy WB0SMX


Sam Birnbaum
 

Hi Randy,

Thanks for the reply.

73,

Sam W2JDB



-----Original Message-----
From: wb0smx <rdpecken@...>
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Aug 19, 2021 6:24 pm
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] WSJT UDP Message Format #networking

It runs in the node-red environment only.  For most people, they have it running on a Raspberry Pi.  They set it up to run automatically on restarts.  Typically, there is a timer or two to set off the program at appropriate intervals, or just once at the right time.  Mine runs 24/7 and attempts to listen to or make connection with the devices periodically if they are not online already.
I've read that  an always on micro such as the PI is better than Windows because of this.
Besides ham radio stuff, it is also useful for other home control projects which would typically be running 24/7.

--
Randy WB0SMX