locked Tx even/1st


Phill Morris
 

Hopefully an easy question for someone to answer regarding the 'Tx even/1st' check box.

I know what 'Tx even/1st ' does in terms of when it allows you to transmit (ie so that you will transmit in the proper (odd or even) minutes.).

I also know that, regardless of whether you have the box ticked or not, your transmission slot will be adjusted to match the station calling CQ that you reply to.

But I don't know whether I should have it ticked or not when I am calling CQ, ie is there an operating convention to work by (I am in the UK, if the geographical location has any impact)
Hopefully someone can point me to a document where this is described rather than saying "I always have it ticked" or something :-)
The WSJTX User Guide does not advise when to have it ticked, it only describes what the tick does (unless i missed that part !)

Thanks

Phill G6EES


Bill Somerville
 

On 09/06/2020 16:25, Phill Morris wrote:

Hopefully an easy question for someone to answer regarding the 'Tx even/1st' check box.

I know what 'Tx even/1st ' does in terms of when it allows you to transmit (ie so that you will transmit in the proper (odd or even) minutes.).

I also know that, regardless of whether you have the box ticked or not, your transmission slot will be adjusted to match the station calling CQ that you reply to.

But I don't know whether I should have it ticked or not when I am calling CQ, ie is there an operating convention to work by (I am in the UK, if the geographical location has any impact)
Hopefully someone can point me to a document where this is described rather than saying "I always have it ticked" or something :-)
The WSJTX User Guide does not advise when to have it ticked, it only describes what the tick does (unless i missed that part !)

Thanks

Phill G6EES

Hi Phill,

there are conventions for when it matters. Meteor scatter operating and long haul DX modes on VHF and up bands use a convention of Even/1st when the DX is between N to S through West, and Odd/2nd when the DX is N to S through East. In general on HF and other bands with only short distance propagation there's no convention.

73
Bill
G4WJS.


Phill Morris
 

Thanks Bill G4WJS

So I will carry on as I have been and not pay any attention to whether that box is ticked or not (I only operate 80m through to 10m)

Phill G6EES


Ed Greenberg <edg@...>
 

Phill, Working HF. No convention, but consider this... If you are sending CQ for a while, hopefully answering contact after contact, and the contacts dry up, you might try switching to the other timeslot. There may be stations who have never heard your CQ because they were transmitting at the same time. 

Other than that, not a big deal. 

Best,
Ed (AE2Z)


Bill Lederer
 

Others have given good answers in this thread.

When I am operating HF SO2R and I am calling CQ, I make sure both are the same, so that both radios are transmitting and listening at the same time.

w8lvn


On Tue, Jun 9, 2020 at 10:25 AM Phill Morris <Phill.morris@...> wrote:

Hopefully an easy question for someone to answer regarding the 'Tx even/1st' check box.

I know what 'Tx even/1st ' does in terms of when it allows you to transmit (ie so that you will transmit in the proper (odd or even) minutes.).

I also know that, regardless of whether you have the box ticked or not, your transmission slot will be adjusted to match the station calling CQ that you reply to.

But I don't know whether I should have it ticked or not when I am calling CQ, ie is there an operating convention to work by (I am in the UK, if the geographical location has any impact)
Hopefully someone can point me to a document where this is described rather than saying "I always have it ticked" or something :-)
The WSJTX User Guide does not advise when to have it ticked, it only describes what the tick does (unless i missed that part !)

Thanks

Phill G6EES




--
--w8lvn--


Chuck Reti WV8A
 

6 Meter FT8 'intercontinental" DX slot, 50.323 MHz, EU CQs even/Ist, NA CQs odd/(2nd), 


Bob G8HGN
 

HI,

Out of interest what period do you call to your WEST, for instance if you have DX to Asia?

73

Bob G8HGN


On 11/06/2020 15:35, Chuck Reti WV8A via groups.io wrote:
6 Meter FT8 'intercontinental" DX slot, 50.323 MHz, EU CQs even/Ist, NA CQs odd/(2nd), 

    


Jim Brown
 

On 6/11/2020 1:58 PM, Bob G8HGN wrote:
Out of interest what period do you call to your WEST, for instance if you have DX to Asia?
Whichever period the stations you want to work are not using. :)

73, Jim K9YC


Bob G8HGN
 

Hi,
 
That sounds like a DXers answer, hi!
 
73 Bob G8HGN

 
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2020 at 10:03 PM
From: "Jim Brown" <k9yc@...>
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Tx even/1st
On 6/11/2020 1:58 PM, Bob G8HGN wrote:
> Out of interest what period do you call to your WEST, for instance if
> you have DX to Asia?

Whichever period the stations you want to work are not using. :)

73, Jim K9YC


Frank Donovan
 

The actual pattern of activity is that most trans-atlantic activity remains
on 50.313 until it gets overcrowded, then some -- but not all --
trans-atlantic activity transitions to 50.323   

73
Frank
W3LPL



From: "Chuck Reti WV8A via groups.io" <chuckr@...>
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2020 2:35:27 PM
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Tx even/1st

6 Meter FT8 'intercontinental" DX slot, 50.323 MHz, EU CQs even/Ist, NA CQs odd/(2nd), 



Arthur Bernstein
 

Jim,
Good answer!
73,
Art., N2KA..

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Brown
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2020 5:03 PM
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Tx even/1st

On 6/11/2020 1:58 PM, Bob G8HGN wrote:
Out of interest what period do you call to your WEST, for instance if
you have DX to Asia?
Whichever period the stations you want to work are not using. :)

73, Jim K9YC


Bill - NO4ON
 

This is what  have observed.  If you double click on a CQ, WSJTX sends the request.  Notice the UTC column.  The time stamp will have an odd or even number at the end.  I believe this determines the time slot.  If so then by toggling Tx even/1st box if checked you will transmit in the even time slot, if not checked you will transmit in the odd time slot.  This will allow you to control what time slot so you can either get the QSO or not.  Place your curser over the box and it will produce a popup that explains what it is doing.

73 

Bill - NO4ON


neil_zampella
 

FWIW .... the "Tx Even/1st only applies to you calling CQ, not to responses.

Neil, KN3ILZ

On 8/30/2021 8:52 AM, Bill - NO4ON wrote:
This is what  have observed.  If you double click on a CQ, WSJTX sends the request.  Notice the UTC column.  The time stamp will have an odd or even number at the end.  I believe this determines the time slot.  If so then by toggling Tx even/1st box if checked you will transmit in the even time slot, if not checked you will transmit in the odd time slot.  This will allow you to control what time slot so you can either get the QSO or not.  Place your curser over the box and it will produce a popup that explains what it is doing.

73 

Bill - NO4ON



Frank Donovan
 

WSJT-X always automagically selects the correct sequence when calling a station

73
Frank
W3LPL

----- Original Message -----
From: neil_zampella &lt;neilz@...&gt;
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Sent: Mon, 30 Aug 2021 10:11:23 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Tx even/1st

FWIW .... the "Tx Even/1st only applies to you calling CQ, not to responses.

Neil, KN3ILZ

On 8/30/2021 8:52 AM, Bill - NO4ON wrote:
&gt; This is what  have observed.  If you double click on a CQ, WSJTX sends
&gt; the request.  Notice the UTC column.  The time stamp will have an odd
&gt; or even number at the end.  I believe this determines the time slot.
&gt;  If so then by toggling Tx even/1st box if checked you will transmit
&gt; in the even time slot, if not checked you will transmit in the odd
&gt; time slot.  This will allow you to control what time slot so you can
&gt; either get the QSO or not.  Place your curser over the box and it will
&gt; produce a popup that explains what it is doing.
&gt;
&gt; 73
&gt;
&gt; Bill - NO4ON
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;


Bill - NO4ON
 

If you are working a QSO, I have observed that you can change the time slot of your response by manipulating the button.  Check it out for yourself.  If you work a response to a CQ, notice that the last digit of the UTC changes if you click or not click the 1st button.  I do not know if that helps or hurts you, but it does change.

Bill - NO4ON


 

That’s only true for FT8 and FT4. With 30 s time-slot modes it alternates between 00 and 30.

 

73 Phil.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Bill - NO4ON
Sent: 30 August 2021 15:17
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Tx even/1st

 

If you are working a QSO, I have observed that you can change the time slot of your response by manipulating the button.  Check it out for yourself.  If you work a response to a CQ, notice that the last digit of the UTC changes if you click or not click the 1st button.  I do not know if that helps or hurts you, but it does change.

Bill - NO4ON

 


--
73 Phil GM3ZZA


 

If you reply to a CQ, WSJT-X will reply in the other time-slot from the one the station calling CQ has used. You have no need to manipulate it yourself. I only ever mess with odd/even, if I’ve got no responses after several CQs I will wait for any possible response. If there is none the I will disable TX before my next scheduled CQ, switch timeslot, and re-enable TX, so then I send CQ in the other timeslot. After checking that the frequency is still clear of course.

 

73 Phil G3ZZA

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Bill - NO4ON
Sent: 30 August 2021 15:17
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Tx even/1st

 

If you are working a QSO, I have observed that you can change the time slot of your response by manipulating the button.  Check it out for yourself.  If you work a response to a CQ, notice that the last digit of the UTC changes if you click or not click the 1st button.  I do not know if that helps or hurts you, but it does change.

Bill - NO4ON

 


--
73 Phil GM3ZZA


Hasan Schiers N0AN
 

There are really two issues for VHF,  and finding the balance is the trick.

When there are locals on, we need to coordinate when we are going to transmit so we do not fill up both sequences. If the locals are working one sequence (like on 1st while pointing east), then it is considerate for EVERYONE to stay that way until you coordinate a move to another sequence together. This way you can have as many people operating at the same time as needed. 

If your locals are all on the same sequence, as they should be, and you come along and see someone calling CQ, that if you answer will put you tx'ing on the opposite sequence of your locals....DON"T ANSWER that CQ. At least that is the considerate way to operate when operator density is an issue (you hear a lot of locals)

If you  can't (or won't) coordinate with locals, then all bets are off, and simply answering, by double clicking,  will put you on the right sequence and ya live with the resulting qrm to or from other locals.

Sequencing can be very important on VHF, not so much on FT8 on HF.

Bottom Line: Coordinate with your locals when possible; observe proper sequencing on VHF when possible, answer whoever you just 'have' to work , regardless of sequence, and live with the outrage.

One thing to watch out for is DX'ing on HF. Certain trends develop from certain parts of the world on certain bands. Watching and learning what they are (even on 6 meters, btw) is very helpful. Once you see that the JA's on 160m are nearly all tx'ing 1st seq, then take advantage of it. Same for EU on 6 meters . etc, etc.

73, N0AN
Hasan


On Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 8:52 AM Bill - NO4ON <NO4ON999@...> wrote:
This is what  have observed.  If you double click on a CQ, WSJTX sends the request.  Notice the UTC column.  The time stamp will have an odd or even number at the end.  I believe this determines the time slot.  If so then by toggling Tx even/1st box if checked you will transmit in the even time slot, if not checked you will transmit in the odd time slot.  This will allow you to control what time slot so you can either get the QSO or not.  Place your curser over the box and it will produce a popup that explains what it is doing.

73 

Bill - NO4ON



Bill - NO4ON
 

There are 4 15 second time slots in a 60 second minute.  0, 30 are the even, 15, 45 are the odd.  If you let the program do it's own thing when you double click on a CQ in the Receive Box, it transfers the CQ to the Transmit side and then issues a transmit command and tx's it. Notice that if the time slot of the CQ is even, the time slot of the tx is odd. I believe that this a design feature since the quickest response to an even msg is an odd msg in the adjacent time slot.  If left alone the call respond process will end in a RR73 and completed QSO.

This whole process is ONLY for those protocols that are time slot based.  (ie. FT4, FT8)

Sometime when you initiate a conversation you do it in between the 0, 15, 30, 45 second boundaries.  The tx will begin on the second that you enable tx, or double click.  Note the in-between numbers at the end of the UTC.  Also notice that it will catch up and act on one of the boundaries, of the odd or even time slot when it tx's again.  The Tx even/1st is a tool.  If you think that you can snatch a QSO from defeat, it is a tool that you may try to bring it home.

73

Bill - NO4ON


 

JT9 and JT65?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Bill - NO4ON
Sent: 30 August 2021 16:54
To: main@WSJTX.groups.io
Subject: Re: [WSJTX] Tx even/1st

 

There are 4 15 second time slots in a 60 second minute.  0, 30 are the even, 15, 45 are the odd.  If you let the program do it's own thing when you double click on a CQ in the Receive Box, it transfers the CQ to the Transmit side and then issues a transmit command and tx's it. Notice that if the time slot of the CQ is even, the time slot of the tx is odd. I believe that this a design feature since the quickest response to an even msg is an odd msg in the adjacent time slot.  If left alone the call respond process will end in a RR73 and completed QSO.

This whole process is ONLY for those protocols that are time slot based.  (ie. FT4, FT8)

Sometime when you initiate a conversation you do it in between the 0, 15, 30, 45 second boundaries.  The tx will begin on the second that you enable tx, or double click.  Note the in-between numbers at the end of the UTC.  Also notice that it will catch up and act on one of the boundaries, of the odd or even time slot when it tx's again.  The Tx even/1st is a tool.  If you think that you can snatch a QSO from defeat, it is a tool that you may try to bring it home.

73

Bill - NO4ON

 


--
73 Phil GM3ZZA